Entrepreneurial Leaders: Unquestionable Importance & Necessary Traits

pexels-photo-26168Exceptional leaders will communicate, with truth, that making one’s way to the top is no easy feat.

Entrepreneurship has its doubtless benefits, but an entrepreneurs’ early days are ones without financial banking and little support. The essential nature of being an entrepreneur means facing off with conformity, and understanding that acceptance, stability, security, and belonging come later. Entrepreneurship is a shifting vessel, which takes unforeseen twists and turns, and the things sought when aboard that aren’t as accessible as ambitious individuals would like.

The long winded transformation of a business, from what it hopes to be to what it will someday be, is a determined process, which could take years or even decades. Established entrepreneurs, such as Elite Daily’s Gerard Adams, will explain that it can take more than a few years to build a company and grow a brand into something that’s proven to be of high value. After 15 years of constructing and assembling a product to be proud of, Adams and partner sold their online news platform to Daily Mail for $50 million. Adams’ latest endeavor,  Fownders, intends to educate and embolden aspiring entrepreneurial leaders.  Adams, like many others, knows that there are a few qualities, above all others, that make leadership more accessible, and those traits are humility, courage, and perseverance.

These traits are items that push determination to the next level. Humility, for instance, is about more than modesty, diffidence, and humbleness; it’s about managing  your strengths, weaknesses, and ego. It’s also about standing ready for education. Looking to other entrepreneurs as teachers opens you up to a well of first-hand knowledge. By accessing that knowledge, you’re enabled and embrace essential quality.

Perseverance is yet another trait that entrepreneurial leaders should take on. Everyone from Oprah Winfrey to Walt Disney has heard ‘no’ and experienced rejection during their pursuit of success. Channelling steadfastness in the face of delay and difficulty, and functionally embracing tenacity and indefatigability is the tried and true way to lead an enterprise.

Courage is fundamental. Having the fearlessness and pluckiness to lead and be a leader shows that you have the necessary conviction and the required ownership of an idea, your business, and your success to excel. Vision and courage go hand-in-hand, and it’s essential for prosperity and achievement.

Entrepreneurial journeys succeed best when  leaders are equipped with valuable leadership skills. The essential nature of entrepreneurship centers on directorship and the accumulation of managerial, influential, and authoritative traits.

Gen Z Entrepreneur Mikaila Ulmer Can Teach Millennials & Other Young People a Great Lesson

lemon-1198006_1920Entrepreneurship is on the rise. This is particularly true when it comes to millennials, who are developing and running their own businesses in great numbers. With that said, many millennials function under the assumption they’re “too young” to launch their own business –that simply isn’t true. 

Mikaila Ulmer, an 11-year-old entrepreneur, is teaching the world what it means to fearlessly move toward personal dreams. Last year, Ulmer appeared on the acclaimed television series Shark Tank, where she unveiled BeeSweet Lemonade, an incredible lemonade that’s both her great-grandmother’s recipe and sweetened with flaxseeds. Ulmer struck a deal with the FUBU CEO and television personality Daymond John for $60,000. His timely investment into her business instigated a four-state deal with Whole Foods to sell her lemonade, recently rebranded as Me & the Bees Lemonade.

While Ulmer is quite younger than the millennial generation, that subset can look to the Gen Z member as a source of inspiration. Her success teaches numerous lessons, including the understanding that entrepreneurship can happen any age, and innovation needs only determination as a dedicated partner.

The idea that an individual is too young to launch a business is totally false. That statement is a symptom of a defeatist attitude. If Ulmer’s success teaches anything, it communicates that no one is too young to make ripples within an industry. This is particularly true if you’re launching a business that seeks to solve a real problem, and you conceived a viable solution to correct said problem. Age is nothing but a number when it comes to innovation, do not resign yourself based on lack of experience. Instead, remember that your age and energy can be a source for success.

Any particular personal and/or professional experience can help to motivate you toward your dreams. Ulmer was just a playful child when she was stung by a bee, and the idea for her lemonade was born. Her zesty beverage doesn’t only promise to satisfy thirst, it also endeavors to help save the lives of bees, which are dying out. By reviewing a personal experience, we can identify past events that sparked a greater interest, much like being stung by a bee generated a greater interest in bees for Ulmer. There are countless money-making moments scattered throughout our lives, which own the potential to become great success stories. Life sometimes hands us tangible solutions, which could be profitable if we recognize its potential.

And when it comes to realizing this dream, and appearing on television in order to pitch your product/business/service/brand to a team of expert investors, you have to be ready. Ambition is not only necessary, it’s powerful when it comes to actively reaching seemingly unattainable goals. The risk may be scary but always proven to be rewarding in some way. Stay committed to yourself, your continued success, your ideas, your products, and your mission, and you’ll find exactly what you need.

Be like Ulmer, use your personality and spunk to find your way toward success, and hopefully millions.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Embrace an Entrepreneurial Mindset and Change Your Life

beach-885109_960_720All entrepreneurs appear to be risk-loving, free-wheeling, and challenge-seeking individuals who are fearless. While lives like theirs seem unattainable, anyone can embrace an entrepreneurial mindset and effectively change their lives.

These experimental and innovative individuals aren’t that different from anyone else. They may seem a world apart, but they’re born in the same hospitals, attend the same grade schools, and walk the same streets. The difference? They simply have an inclination toward risks, creativity, conceptualization, and execution. However, inherently, we all have the ability to access these valued traits in our personal and professional lives. The trick is to cross the line from thinking about developing a business to actually deciding to create a business.

A large part of getting stuck in a rut is a failure to think creatively and take on risks. Without making the decision to take risks or to use one’s imagination, life may appear bleak. This can even be the case for those who are otherwise satisfied in their lives. By utilizing an entrepreneurial mindset at home and at work, we learn to be more creative and purposeful with our space and time, elevating everything from brunch to business endeavors. Of course, this is easier said than done. Making the shift from where you are to where you want to be involves accepting a challenge and seeking a success-driven life.

Find satisfaction in overcoming challenges and embracing an entrepreneurial outlook.  Why do this? Well, it’s simple. It’s easy to allow an uninspired job to bog you down and absorb you wholly. The notion of ‘overcoming and embracing’ fosters the idea that you should seek alternatives to your current position in life. The entrepreneurial principles beg you to stay committed to self-development, purpose, strategy, and responsibility, which are essential for the growth of a business.

The entrepreneurial mindset, which is a mindset that leans toward defiance, problem-solving, and rule breaking, tends to disagree with presented rules. The inventiveness of entrepreneurs keeps them dissatisfied and forces them to always modify the rules for improvement. This isn’t to say you should totally disregard the rules at your current workplace, but consider those rules, and find areas where some of those regulations can be improved. Entrepreneurs are much like writers, who adhere only to those rules that help them to achieve those goals while disregarding the rules that appear limiting.

Be a decider, not a permission-asker. Entrepreneurs recognize when decisions must be made. Rather than asking around for advice, then educate themselves on ways to solve the issues on their own. Of course, these are judgment calls and risks that may or may not be met with positivity.

Fear of self-investment holds us back. Ultimately, the thing that holds entrepreneurs back isn’t the lack of ideas, it’s the fact that there are no guarantees. Undoubtedly, the entrepreneurial spark has burned many, but it has ignited a clear path toward success for many others. This fear often comes to us in the form of doubt, and we become receptive to disapproval.

Often, it takes decades to shake feelings of fear, and success isn’t realized until later in life. Many don’t realize they don’t have to capsize their lives in order to become an entrepreneur. It simply means making yourself available to small changes that will facilitate your dreams. This means putting aside a little extra green in order to grow your future aspirations; trying something risky every day; networking with other entrepreneurial people; becoming open to new adventures; writing down new ideas, and communicating your interest in developing a business to everyone you meet. This will help you to take a step forward toward your dreams.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Compassion In Leadership Is More Important Than You Think, Part II

Handshake_(Workshop_Cologne_'06)Read the first part to “Compassion In Leadership Is More Important Than You Think” by clicking here. 

Steve Jobs isn’t the only celebrated visionary who’s been accused of being a tyrant. A new survey reveals that self-oriented bosses are more prevalent than they ever have been. Lynn Taylor, the author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant, conducted a survey in which she commissioned 1,002 adults. The survey found that 86% of Americans felt that bad boss behaviors go unnoticed all too often, and it affects far too many people.

There was also a five-year national study that was very telling with regard to harsh boss behavior. The study compared childish traits in bosses between 2004 and 2009. These traits included being self-oriented, stubborn, overly demanding, and impulsive, as well as having habits like interrupting and throwing tantrums. The result? The “self-oriented” trait increased by 50% to the top spot in those five years. Also, 7 out of 10 Americans said that “bosses and toddlers with too much power act alike.”

Aside from causing emotional unrest, abusive bosses are bad for the physical health of employees, also. A study in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine researched over 3,100 men over a 10-year period in typical work settings. The result showed that employees with bosses who were inconsiderate, secretive, incompetent, and uncommunicative were 60 percent more likely to suffer heart attacks or other life-threatening conditions. This was just one of any studies showing that bosses who have bad qualities affect the physical health of their employees.

If you are a leader, remember to show compassion to your employees. It may seem that being tough as nails are how to get ahead, but it’s just as important to foster a positive work environment. It is important to do this for the health of your employees and for the benefit of your company. It is easy to crack under pressure, but if leaders have empathy for their employees instead of throwing tantrums, they are much likely to reduce this stress in the future.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Compassion In Leadership Is More Important Than You Think, Part I

640px-Shake_handThose who are in business school or any kind of leadership program will likely learn to lead with their minds. It is a constant belief and teaching that leaders should be rational, tough, and strategic. While it is, of course, important to be diplomatic and use your mind, it is also important to use your heart. There isn’t nearly enough emphasis placed upon the idea of leading with your heart. However, research shows that to be a successful leader, one also needs to show empathy and compassion.

It is easy to think that a coercive style of leading will work. After all, it does often garner results  in the short-term. But it can mean something very negative long-term for your company. Leading this way creates a dissonance between a leader and his or her employees. This leads to a number of toxic emotions in the workplace, such as anxiety, fear, and anger.

It is common to see people in the workplace cracking under pressure and due to the authoritarian style of leadership. These types of leaders also tend to see their job as a competition or a form of warfare. As a result, these people also talk badly about one another. This is evident in politics as well, as we see many politicians criticizing one another and assassinating each other’s characters.

Ray Williams of Psychology Today recently spoke about how nice people actually can succeed. So many people think that the way to command respect is to be brutally harsh, but the reality is that kindness does pay off. Some people say “I don’t like him, but I respect him,” but this expression does not have much truth in relation to long-term success. Steve Jobs, for example, is celebrated by many as a visionary. But it has been stated that he was also a tyrant at times. He often went into fits of rage and took credit for other people’s ideas. He was a brilliant man, but he wasn’t always a very nice one.

Read the second part to “Compassion In Leadership Is More Important Than You Think” by clicking here. 


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.