3 Things to Do When Juggling Your 9-to-5 and Your Own Business

JugglingThe daily grind can be difficult enough without harboring a desire to grow a business from the ground up. A bitter reality is most must work a nine-to-five while they’re starting their own business when they’re off the clock. Because of this full-time schedule, it’s easy for many hopeful business leaders to lose motivation and drive. The transition from employee to entrepreneur is not an easy conversion. In fact, it can be downright difficult and discouraging, it’s a period of time filled with tests, challenges, and trials. Nonetheless,  you must stay committed to your dreams and habitually identify reasons you started this endeavor to help you to continue to strive forward.

1. Remember the Why

One way to make sure you always stay connected to your dream is to always remember the ‘why’. Remember why you first desired entrepreneurship and remember why you took your initial steps toward it. Whether you have dreams of being your own boss, being financially independent, having control over your own time or your want to be as creative as possible, identify why that is important and remind yourself of that every day.

2. Dream Realized

Make sure your dream isn’t a dream deferred by staying committed to the desires that drive you. You find that you’ll encounter obstacles to success, so look to trusting individuals to help you access to research and defeat barriers. Above all, make a promise to yourself that there isn’t an obstacle big enough to pull you away from the things in life that you want to do in life.

3. Vision Board for Success

If the road to success seems a bit foggy, plan ahead and anticipating any challenges or needs. Create a detailed vision board, documented what your life as an entrepreneur will look like. Depict your future customer base, your ideal work day, the activities you’ll engage in, potential social media practices and what your income will be. After you’ve identified all of these things, revisit these plans every day. Focus on what it would be like to have a flourishing business and describe how you plan to circumvent any foreseen or unforeseen challenges.
Remember, stay focused on your full-time job while working on your full-time goal. By handling both tasks well, you’ll demonstrate your stellar time management and prove that you’ll be able to handle future scheduling challenges.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Business Acumen is a Necessity for Entrepreneurs

The power of a strong general business acumen is mighty and sure, and trends can’t rightfully unseat the need for this vital skill. Industry giants and newcomers alike have come to recognize the importance of being able to exercise judgment and present a breadth of understanding.

A quick and acute understanding of business, which normally results in a good outcome, is aptly recognized as business acumen. The high levels of keenness and applicable understanding known to business acumen are tools frequently used by strategic leaders who understand those features produce successful and proficient organizations.

Developing acumen is a matter of increasing knowledge about one’s industry. While gathering this knowledge, it’s also important to become a better listener in the process. Entrepreneurs who master relationship building, business intelligence, enhancement, decision-making, leadership, stakeholder engagement, strategy development people development and communication are primed for success. It’s necessary to organize targeted training and never forget that the importance of overall development and learning.

Business acumen is downright necessary for the next generation of supply management professionals. In the interest of acquiring leadership roles and demonstrating high levels of job satisfaction and engagement, it’s important that an understanding of business acumen if far-reaching, that it makes sense to older individuals in the C-suite, recruiters, and young business-minded professionals.

Read more on the subject by checking out an article on business acumen written by Jim Barnes, ISM Services Managing Director for the Institute for Supply Management, which is featured in Supply Chain Management Review.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Components of an Ideal Company Culture

Collaboration, innovation, quality, risk-taking and meritocracy are essential components when harvesting an ideal company culture. There are a number of strategies for improving company culture developed by professionals, across numerous industries. We can expect that some of these will work flawlessly while other plans can perpetuate non-cohesive environments. 

It’s important that companies match culture with strategy, developing practices and attitudes that result in effectiveness and corporate allegiance. Additionally, companies must focus on critical shifts in behaviors, honoring pre-existing strengths within a company’s culture, incorporating informal and formal cultural interventions, monitor cultural progress and cultural intervention at the beginning, rather than after the fact.
When doing monitoring and measuring cultural progress, it’s important that executives harness the strength of employees to gauge and improve business performance and critical behaviors. They must also establish specific intervention milestones and acknowledging underlying feelings, beliefs and attitudes by surveying employees to better understand their thoughts, ambitions, needs and wants.
To learn more about making cultural change within a company, check out this article featured in the Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

Building an Impressive Culture is Vital for Ongoing Success

Hefty corporations and smaller entrepreneurial outfits differ significantly, but they also have a great deal in common. They both deal with the promotion and sale of goods and services, and they, additionally, are invested in the development of a charming, warm and productive company culture.
Building a company culture that’s strong, close and creative requires a great deal from employees and employers. The size of a company doesn’t necessarily matter, nor budgets or industries. However, behavioral and environmental conditions are important factors that influence creative output, talent attraction and the overall outcome of a company.
There are multiple ways to develop an inspired workspace, particularly when a company is equipped with staff who are deeply engaged and attracted to their projects. However, one has to strike a balance between attracting energetic employees, developing constructive management and composing new strategies to effectively sway a company’s outlook, which effectively strengthens the core of a firm. Additionally, it empowers dedicated professional and improve product output.

Re-establishing and restructuring a company’s culture is a matter of making sure that top management creates the circumstances that allow for behavioral and cultural change within a place. An important step is to rid the company of any practices that erode an employee’s pride in a company, that includes hostile limitations and overzealous regulations. Instead, trust your employees to do the right thing and demonstrate what behaviors are expected by leading by example.

Companies such as Aetna masterfully did an about-face. Challenges with employees, customers and physicians plagued the company in the early 2000s, but they managed to change the culture of the company, which was once known for its tolerance of mediocrity and its suspiciousness of outsiders.

Today, Aetna has changed the conversation, they sought out employees at each level of the company, who helped to devise and input incredible strategy, leading to the design and transformation of a company culture. Because of those changes, Aetna was able to identify some of it’s biggest problems and greatest strengths. Importantly, the head honchos didn’t try to force this change overnight. Also, they didn’t describe their toward an impressive atmosphere as “cultural change,” instead, they continued to preserve the strengths while cutting away weaknesses. They encouraged employees to put customer commitment at the forefront of their minds and quietly worked to rebuild pride.

Nowadays, Aetna’s employees are described as enthusiastic and reinvigorated. Simultaneously, the company has seen the financial growth that complements the company’s overall efforts. Building an impressive culture can undermine disasters and it can help create a workforce that’s interested in the company’s peak performance, not just their own paychecks.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.

 

Comcast Business Announces Entrepreneurial/Startup Contest

Comcast Business, a company that provides scalable internet, voice and data services to a number of businesses, is searching for Florida’s most pioneering entrepreneurs and startup companies. Comcast’s “Innovations 4 Entrepreneurs” competition is an opportunity for current and hopeful business owners from Florida can enter the competition, which will award winners $30,000 for beating out other teams of business experts, who will demonstrate their business ability and showcase their plans.

Applicants were asked to submit 250-word essays, which offered an answer to the question: “How could your business use technology to help enhance your business?” These entrepreneurs and startups were also encouraged to visit the Comcast Business Community for complete program details, and it also identifies specifications for the application and essay. The contest will effectively draw startup businesses and entrepreneurs into the light, which will lead to more jobs and economic influence.

Two winners from Florida will be selected by judges, as well as winners from the other 14 Comcast Business regions. One winner will be recognized for their startup company. Another will be one winner named for the ‘entrepreneurs’ category. Additionally, 30 regional winners will earn $10,000 in cash.

Approximately six of the regional winners will be selected as grand prize winners, earning an additional $20,000 in cash and a trip to Philadelphia for participation in a group session involving industry professionals. Industry professionals who will be in attendance are John Jantsch, Marketing Consultant, speaker and best-selling author; Denice Hasty, Senior Vice President, Product and Marketing, Comcast Business; Anita Campbell, Founder, CEO & Publisher of Small Business Trends; Robert Irvine restaurateur, TV star and entrepreneur; Sam Schwartz, Chief Business Development Officer at Comcast; Louis Toth, Managing Director for Comcast Ventures; and experts from Drexel University’s Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship.

Entries for the contest are due by March 11, 2016. The online application can be found at http://cbcommunity.comcast.com/i4e. Voting will take place between April 25 and May 13. The regional winners will be announced April 25, 2016. Also, the six grand prize winners will be announced June 6. The Grand Prize event will take place later in the year on August 2016.


Eddie Dovner is an entrepreneur, inventor, and CEO who is based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Learn more about Eddie Dovner by visiting his pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, and SlideShare. Also, please learn more by visiting EdwardDovner.org and EddieDovner.com.